Rye and Winchelsea

Fabulous weather for a walk yesterday. The forecast was correct for once and I’d had a couple of walks worked out, one in Essex and one in Sussex, neither of which happened in the end because the trains weren’t running (Essex, boo) or were delayed from Victoria (Sussex, boo hoo). Beloved suggested a walk closer to home but I wasn’t ready to give up on the coast that easily so I searched the south coast for a beach walk and National Rail website for getting to beach without having to do plains/ trains/ automobiles and there it was – Rye. Pretty easily accessible on the high speed train to Ashford and then a local train. We did 11 miles walking from Rye towards Winchelsea, then Winchelsea Beach and back to Rye via nature reserve.

This had pretty much everything you’d want from a good walk: great scenery with lots of changes, good nature, not too many people, bits of history… Granted, it was flat but we’re totally out of shape so that wasn’t a bad thing. First, as we walked along the Saxon Shore path, lots and lots of sheep.

sheep walking rye

These two reminded me of the trio of ‘gossiping sheep’ we saw on a walk in Wales last year so I thought this photo would make a good companion piece. Quite a few sheep in this flock seemed happy to even pose for photos, later on in the day they’d all run away. Shortly after, we walked past the ruins of Camber Castle and decided to take a closer look.

camber castle

 

It was built by Henry VIII as defence against a French invasion but abandoned by 1627. There was lots of dried grass around, which made me think of scorched earth tactics and storming castles but managed to contain self and just walk around.

camber castle ruin

 

Love a good ruin, point me in a direction of old crumbling stones and leave me to it. Shame you couldn’t go inside and climb about this one.

My original plan was to bypass Winchelsea but our water supply was running low and Beloved was also quite keen on a pub stop so we did a detour. What a pretty little village. We stopped for a pint and we got some water, then went into the local church, St. Thomas’s (named after Thomas Beckett) and got a brief lecture on its history.

winchelsea church

 

It’s a medieval church, renovated since and now featuring some pretty good Art Deco-ish stained glass windows.

stained glass winchelsea church

 

Not that you can see all that much in my photo. As we’d already been to the pub and the majority of the walk was still ahead of us, we didn’t stay long in the church. I’d also decided to do a shortcut and walk the quickest route to Winchelsea Beach, forgetting the Royal Military Canal route and going across sheep pastures and dikes. The beach was windy and almost deserted.

the sea at winchelsea1

 

We sat in silence listening to the sound of wind and crashing waves. I took a lot of photos of crashing waves. We walked along the shingle beach back towards Rye, then into the nature reserve, where the scenery was completely different again, still and calm.

nature reserve rye

Lots of birds, lots of wild flowers and only a few dog walkers here and there. Good view towards Rye Harbour too (at least that’s what I think it was).

view towards rye harbour

 

We didn’t go into Rye Harbour but came back via the ruined castle although this time, we’d put the map away, decided to be clever and find our own shortcut then promptly got lost in the labyrinth of dikes, scaring a lot of sheep in the process. Eventually found a way out and back to Rye where we had just enough time to sample some very good ice cream before catching the train back. When we got to the station, the tiny platform was already pretty full with ten minutes to train and Beloved had visions of a hellish train journey back from Whitstable last year but all was well in the end and we were home in no time, exhausted, sunburnt (me, despite spraying self with lots of protection) and happy.

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